Andrea del Verrocchio

Andrea del Verrocchio (1435-1488) was an artist who developed a dynamic and versatile approach to drawing in his workshop. His importance in the history of art and impact on the development of drawing in the Italian Renaissance was transformative. He marks a key transition in the application, use, and purpose of drawing in the Renaissance Workshop.

Andrea del Verrocchio, Head of a Woman with Braided Hair (recto), black chalk or charcoal (possibly both), pen and ink, lead white heightening on off-white prepared paper, 324 x 273 mm. © The Trustees of the British Museum.
Andrea del Verrocchio, Head of a Woman with Braided Hair (recto), black chalk or charcoal (possibly both), pen and ink, lead white heightening on off-white prepared paper, 324 x 273 mm. © The Trustees of the British Museum.
Workshop of Andrea del Verrocchio, Alexander the Great, c. 1483/1485, 559 x 367 mm (unframed), marble. Courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington
Workshop of Andrea del Verrocchio, Alexander the Great, c. 1483/1485, 559 x 367 mm (unframed), marble. Courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington

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